Game Music for the 4th of July

Happy Independence Day to all my fellow Americans!  This is a day to celebrate all the best, most awesome things we enjoy about being Americans – and that includes our love of video games!  So to celebrate, I’ve gathered together some of the top patriotic songs of the USA as they appeared in popular game soundtracks.  Enjoy!

Guitar Hero 5 –  My Country, Tis of Thee

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Civilization V – America the Beautiful

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Fallout 3 – Yankee Doodle

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Civil War 2: Generals – When Johnny Comes Marching Home

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BioShock Infinite – You’re A Grand Old Flag

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Fallout 3 – Hail Columbia

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Civil War 2: Generals – Battle Hymn of the Republic

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Civilization IV – Marines’ Hymn (The United States Marine Corps)

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Studio1_GreenWinifred Phillips is an award-winning game music composer with more than 11 years of experience in the video game industry.  Her projects include Assassin’s Creed Liberation, God of War, the LittleBigPlanet franchise, and many others.  She is the author of the award-winning bestseller A COMPOSER’S GUIDE TO GAME MUSIC, published by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press.  Follow her on Twitter @winphillips.

My fellow speakers at the North American Conference on Video Game Music

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The North American Conference on Video Game Music begins this Saturday, and I’m definitely looking forward to giving the keynote speech there!  It will be great to talk about some of the concepts from my book, A Composer’s Guide to Game Music, and  I’m also very pleased that I’ll have the opportunity to meet such a wonderful collection of scholars in the field of game music study.  Since not everyone will be able to travel to Fort Worth for the conference this weekend, I thought I’d provide you with some of the stimulating ideas that will be enlivening the forthcoming conference.  Below you’ll find a collection of links to research papers, articles, essays, PowerPoint presentations and YouTube videos that some of the speakers from the upcoming event have previously created on the subject of video game music.

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Guitar Hero: “Not like playing guitar at all”?

by Dominic Arsenault

(Profile on Academia.edu)

Dominic Arsenault is an assistant professor in the fields of video game design, history and musicology at the University of Montreal, Canada.  This weekend he’ll be presenting a paper at the conference entitled “From Attunement to Interference: A Typology of Musical Intertextuality in Video Games.”  Below you’ll find a link to his 2008 research paper from Loading… The Journal of the Canadian Game Studies Association.  This article explores the mechanics of guitar playing in the music simulation videogame Guitar Hero, comparing this gameplay mechanic to the musicianship of playing a real-world guitar.

Link to research paper at the Simon Fraser University Library

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Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams: Popular Music, Narrative, and Dystopia in Bioshock

by William Gibbons (Twitter @musicillogical)

William Gibbons is the organizing chair of the North American Conference on Video Game Music, and teaches musicology at Texas Christian University.  This weekend he’ll be presenting the paper “Navigating the Musical Uncanny Valley: Red Dead Redemption, Ni no Kuni, and the Dangers of Cinematic Game Scores” at the upcoming conference in Fort Worth.  Below you’ll find a link to his research paper on the music of the video game Bioshock, as published in 2011 in Game Studies: The International Journal of Computer Game Research.

Link to the research paper in Game Studies: The International Journal of Computer Game Research

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Links to Fantasy: The Music of The Legend of Zelda, Final Fantasy, and the Construction of the Video Game Experience

by Julianne M. Grasso (Twitter: @_juliannemarie)

Julianne M. Grasso is currently a doctoral candidate at the University of Chicago, pursuing her degree in music theory.  She’ll be presenting the talk “Intersections of Musical Performance and Play in Video Games” this weekend in Fort Worth.  What follows is a link to a fascinating and entertaining essay she wrote in 2009 about her experience writing her undergraduate thesis on the music of Zelda and Final Fantasy for her music degree from Princeton University.

Link to Essay on the Princeton University Website

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Maps and Legends: FPS-Based Interfaces for Composition and Immersive Performance

by Robert Hamilton (Twitter: @robertkhamilton)

Professor Robert Hamilton teaches in the Department of Music at Stanford University, and is also a lecturer at the California College of the Arts on Experimental Game Development.  His presentation this weekend will be “Designing Game-Centric Academic Curricula for Procedural Audio and Music.”  Below, you can read his 2007 paper exploring a new interactive music composition system triggered by a gamer’s position and actions within an in-game virtual space. This paper was presented at the International Computer Music Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Link to Research Paper at the Stanford University Web Site

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SOUNDS Like Fun and Games: Exploring the Role and Development of the Video Game Sound and Music Designer

by Christopher J. Hopkins (YouTube: hopkinschris)

Professor Christopher J. Hopkins researches chiptune music while teaching in the music department of Long Island University in New York.  This weekend he’ll be presenting a paper entitled “Compositional Techniques of Chiptune Music.”  Below, you can read an interesting PowerPoint presentation from a speech that Professor Hopkins gave about the discipline of video game sound and music at the 2013 Summer Teaching with Technology Institute.

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There’s Always a Lighthouse: Commentary and Foreshadowing in the Diegetic Music of BioShock Infinite

by Enoch Jacobus (Twitter: @enochobus)

Professor Enoch Jacobus’ fields of research include ludomusicology and music theory pedagogy.  He teaches advanced musicianship and orchestration at Asbury University in Kentucky.  At the upcoming Fort Worth conference he’ll be presenting a paper on BioShock Infinite entitled “Lighter Than Air: A Return to Columbia.”  Happily, Professor Jacobus has previously given a speech on the music of BioShock Infinite at the inaugural North American Conference on Video Game Music that took place last year, and we can enjoy that speech via the YouTube video below:

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The Origins of Musical Style in Video Games: 1977 – 1983 (Chapter 12 of The Oxford Handbook of Film Music Studies)

by Neil Lerner (Email at Davidson College: nelerner at davidson dot edu)

Neil Lerner teaches a wide assortment of music courses as a professor in the music department of Davidson College in North Carolina. At the conference in Fort Worth this weekend he’ll be giving a presentation entitled “Teaching the Soundtrack in a Video Game Music Class.”  Neil Lerner has been active with several scholarly journals in the field of musicology.  He has served on the editorial board of Music, Sound, and the Moving Image, and is currently the secretary for the Society for American Music.  He also had the honor of holding the position of president of the American Musicological Society-Southeast Chapter.  Below is a link to a chapter he contributed to The Oxford Handbook of Film Music Studies, as excerpted on Google Books.

Link to Chapter on Google Books

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Chaos in the Cosmos: The Play of Contradictions in the Music of Katamari Damacy

by Steven B. Reale (Twitter: @StevenBReale)

Steven Reale is a music theorist, ludomusicology researcher, and associate professor at Youngstown State University in Ohio.  At the Fort Worth conference this weekend he’ll be serving as the program chair. Here’s a 2011 research paper he wrote on the music of the video game Katamari Damacy for the journal ACT, published by The Research Institute for Music Theater Studies in Thurnau, Germany.

Link to Research Paper at the University EPub Library Bayreuth